Archive for the ‘amateur sports’ Category

Neuroscience researchers at the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore have shown for the first time what happens to the visual perceptions of healthy but sleep-deprived volunteers who fight to stay awake, like people who try to drive through the night.

The scientists found that even after sleep deprivation, people had periods of near-normal brain function in which they could finish tasks quickly. However, this normalcy mixed with periods of slow response and severe drops in visual processing and attention, according to their paper, published in the Journal of Neuroscience on May 21.

“Interestingly, the team found that a sleep-deprived brain can normally process simple visuals, like flashing checkerboards. But the ‘higher visual areas’ – those that are responsible for making sense of what we see – didn’t function well,” said Dr. Michael Chee, lead author and professor at the Neurobehavioral Disorders Program at Duke-NUS. “Herein lies the peril of sleep deprivation.”

The research team, including colleagues at the University of Michigan and University of Pennsylvania, used magnetic resonance imaging to measure blood flow in the brain during speedy normal responses and slow “lapse” responses. The study was funded by grants from the DSO National Laboratories in Singapore, the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the NASA Commercialization Center, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Study subjects were asked to identify letters flashing briefly in front of them. They saw either a large H or S, and each was made up of smaller Hs or Ss. Sometimes the large letter matched the smaller letters; sometimes they didn’t. Scientists asked the volunteers to identify either the smaller or the larger letters by pushing one of two buttons.

During slow responses, sleep-deprived volunteers had dramatic decreases in their higher visual cortex activity. At the same time, as expected, their frontal and parietal ‘control regions’ were less able to make their usual corrections.

Scientists also could see brief failures in the control regions during the rare lapses that volunteers had after a normal night’s sleep. However, the failures in visual processing were specific only to lapses that occurred during sleep deprivation.

The scientists theorize that this sputtering along of cognition during sleep deprivation shows the competing effects of trying to stay awake while the brain is shutting things down for sleep. The brain ordinarily becomes less responsive to sensory stimuli during sleep, Chee said.

This study has implications for a whole range of people who have to struggle through night work, from truckers to on-call doctors. “The periods of apparently normal functioning could give a false sense of competency and security when in fact, the brain’s inconsistency could have dire consequences,” Chee said.

“The study task appeared simple, but as we showed in previous work, you can’t effectively memorize or process what you see if your brain isn’t capturing that information,” Chee said. “The next step in our work is to see what we might do to improve things, besides just offering coffee, now that we have a better idea where the weak links in the system are.”

 

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Article adapted by MD Sports from original press release.
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Contact: Mary Jane Gore
Duke University Medical Center

Other authors of the study include Jiat Chow Tan, Hui Zheng, and Sarayu Parimal of the Cognitive Neuroscience Lab at the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School; Daniel Weissman of the University of Michigan Psychology Department; David Dinges of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; and Vitali Zagorodnov of the Computer Engineering Department of the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

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Researchers from the Division of Health Promotion & Sports Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University have found steroid use among teen girls is not limited to athletes and often goes hand in hand with other unhealthy choices, including smoking and taking diet pills. The study was published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, a JAMA/Archives journal.Diane Elliot, M.D., professor of medicine (health promotion and sports medicine), OHSU School of Medicine, and colleagues analyzed findings from the Center for Disease Control’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey of 7,544 ninth- through 12th-grade girls from around the country. The questionnaire asked about sports participation, anabolic steroid and drug use, and other illegal or unhealthy behaviors. Approximately 5 percent of participants reported prior or ongoing anabolic steroid use.

In addition to greater substance use, young female steroid users were more likely to have had sexual intercourse before age 13; have been pregnant; drink and drive or have ridden with a drinking driver; carry a weapon; have been in a fight on school property; have feelings of sadness or hopelessness almost every day for at least two weeks; and have attempted suicide. Those reporting anabolic steroid use were less likely to participate in team athletics.

Overall, more than two-thirds of those surveyed reported trying to change their weight. Girls who used steroids were more likely try extreme weight-loss techniques, such as vomiting and laxative use.

Adolescent girls reporting anabolic steroid use had significantly more other health-harming behaviors, Elliot explained, “They were much more likely to use other unhealthy substances, including cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana and cocaine.”

“Across all grades, these seem to be troubled adolescents with co-occurring health-compromising activities in the domains of substance use, sexual behavior, violence and mental health,” Elliot said. “Anabolic steroid use is a marker for high-risk girls. High-risk young women have received less attention than young men, perhaps reflecting that their actions are less socially, albeit more personally, destructive. Further study is needed to develop effective interventions for these young women.”

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Article adapted by MD Sports Weblog from original press release.
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Contact: Tamara Hargens
Oregon Health & Science University

Baseball team owners, players and fans seem to agree on the importance of drug testing for steroids, according to current reports, but the entire scope of performance-enhancing substances available for all athletes is vastly broader and many of the drugs employed by athletes are not easily detectable, says a Penn State researcher.”The use, misuse and abuse of drugs have long shaken the foundations of amateur and professional sports–baseball, football, track and field, gymnastics and cycling, to name just a few,” says Dr. Charles Yesalis, Penn State professor of exercise and sport science and health policy and administration. “The problem is not new. But like the rest of technology, doping in sport has grown in scientific and ethical complexity. In addition to drugs, we have natural hormones, blood doping, diuretics, nutritional supplements, social and recreational drugs, stimulants and miscellaneous substances, some of which may not even be on any list of banned substances.”

While drug testing technology struggles to keep up, an array of new and emerging technologies has arrived or is on the horizon with potential for abuse by athletes including gene transfer therapy, stem cell transplantation, muscle fiber phenotype transformation, red blood cell substitutes and new drug delivery systems, says Yesalis

“It is not too hard to imagine the day when muscles can be selectively enlarged or contoured,” according to the book. “Just imagine the consequences of a kinesiologist isolating specific muscles and selectively injecting designer genes into those muscles to maximize their function.”

The new book brings together the latest and most comprehensive scientific information about performance-enhancing substances, as well as discussion of drug testing, legal and social issues, and future directions by sports governing organizations.

“Sport has a responsibility to maintain a level playing field for the trial of skill,” Yesalis says. “The use of chemical and pharmacologist agents is cheating – just like using a corked baseball bat. But unlike the bat, doping is shrouded in mystery. Athletes and their advisors are constantly seeking ‘gray areas” surrounding the rules, and if something is not explicitly banned, then why not try it. This slippery slope of rationalization is treacherous and appealing to a player or team seeking glory and money rewards.”

In one chapter, “Drug Testing and Sport and Exercise,” author R. Craig Kammerer suggests that improvement in current tests and developments in new methods will assist future policymaking by athletic federations. However, effective testing must become more widespread and include unannounced testing outside of competition. Sanctions against athletes must be more fairly and uniformly applied, with thorough investigation to avoid false positive results and ruin an athlete’s career.

The difficulty of detecting and preventing the abuse of performance enhancing substances by adult athletes may seem futile but remains necessary as part of the effort to discourage abuse by youths who emulate professional athletes and also seek a winning advantage, Yesalis notes.

A recent government study of adolescent drug use shows an alarming increase in anabolic steroid use among middle school youths from 1998-1999 with an estimated 2.7 percent of eighth graders saying they have used the drugs. A larger survey by Blue Cross and Blue Shield estimates that one million U.S. children between the ages of 12 and 17 may have taken performance-enhancing substances including creatine, according to the book.

“Children and teens can seriously harm their future health by misusing these substances,” Yesalis says. “For example, steroids alone can cause scarring acne, hair loss and testicular atrophy, and may increase the risk of stroke and heart disease. It is just as important to note that little is known about the health consequences of many of the other substances used to enhance performance. Yet some coaches and parents look the other way and even actively encourage the use of performance-enhancing substances in pursuit of scholarships and winning.

“There is too much fame and fortune to be gained by being a winner in sports,” he notes. “It’s interesting to see that baseball fans being polled support drug testing and a ban on steroids, but it will take fans of all major sports to take a stand by turning off their TV sets or not buying a ticket to sports events before adult athletes, coaches and team owners stop trying to cheat. And, that’s probably not going to happen.”

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Article adapted by MD Sports Weblog from original press release.
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Contact: Vicki Fong
Penn State