Archive for the ‘40yd dash’ Category

Trained runners who severely limit the amount of fat in their diets may be suppressing their immune system and increasing their susceptibility to infections and inflammation, a University at Buffalo study has shown.In findings presented here today (May 22, 1999) at the fourth International Society for Exercise and Immunology Symposium, lead author Jaya T. Venkatraman, Ph.D., reported that running 40 miles per week on a diet composed of approximately 17 percent fat compromised the runners’ immune response.

The medium and high-fat diets, composed of approximately 32 and 41 percent fat respectively, left the immune system intact, and enhanced certain components, the findings showed.

“The data suggest that higher-fat diets may lower the proinflammatory cytokines, free radicals and hormones, and may enhance the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines,” Venkatraman said.

Venkatraman is an associate professor of nutrition in the Department of Physical Therapy, Exercise and Nutrition Sciences in the UB School of Health Related Professions.

Earlier studies published by a UB research group headed by David Pendergast, Ed.D., professor of physiology and biophysics, reported that competitive runners who increased the proportion of fat in their diets improved their endurance with no negative effect on weight, body composition, blood pressure, pulse rate or total cholesterol. (See editor’s note)

However, since a high level of fat was thought to be immunosuppressive, the researchers sought to determine if increasing dietary fat would compromise various elements of the immune system, while improving performance.

“In general, moderate levels of exercise are known to enhance the immune system,” said Venkatraman. “But high-intensity exercise and endurance exercise produce excess levels of free radicals, which may place stress on the immune system.

“Since we have shown that athletes perform better on a higher-fat diet than on a low-fat diet, it was important to determine if the higher-fat diet would further compromise the immune system,” she said. “We found that it did not, but the very-low-fat diet did.”

The study involved six female and eight male competitive runners who trained at 40 miles a week and were part of a larger performance study. They spent a month on their normal diets, followed by a month each on diets composed of approximately 17 percent, 32 percent and 41 percent fat. Protein remained stable at 15 percent and carbohydrates made up the difference.

The immune status of the runners was obtained by analyzing concentrations of essential components of the immune system — leukocytes, cytokines and plasma cortisol — in blood samples taken before and after an endurance exercise test. The tests were conducted at the end of each four-week diet period.

Results showed that natural killer cells, a type of leukocyte and one of the body’s defense mechanisms marshaled to fight infection, were more than doubled in runners after the high-fat diet, compared to the low-fat regimen. Levels of PGE2, inflammation-causing prostaglandins, increased after the endurance test and were higher when the runners were on the low-fat diet.

This study is part of a larger investigation to determine the effects of dietary fat on performance, biochemical and nutritional status, and plasma lipids and lipoprotein profiles in distance runners being conducted by a study group composed of — in addition to Venkatraman and Pendergast — Peter Horvath, Ph.D., associate professor in the UB Department of Physical Therapy, Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, and John Leddy, M.D., clinical professor of orthopaedics and associate director of the UB Sports Medicine Institute.

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Article adapted by MD Sports Weblog from original press release.
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Contact: Lois Baker
University at Buffalo

Endorphins and other morphine-like substances known as opioids, which are released during exercise, don’t just make you feel good — they may also protect you from heart attacks, according to University of Iowa researchers.

It has long been known that the so-called “runner’s high” is caused by natural opioids that are released during exercise. However, a UI study, which is published in the online edition of the American Journal of Physiology’s Heart and Circulatory Physiology, suggests that these opioids may also be responsible for some of exercise’s cardiovascular benefits.

Working with rats, UI researchers showed that blocking the receptors that bind morphine, endorphins and other opioids eliminates the cardiovascular benefits of exercise. Moreover, the UI team showed that exercise was associated with increased expression of several genes involved in opioid pathways that appear to be critical in protecting the heart.

“This is the first evidence linking the natural opioids produced during exercise to the cardio-protective effects of exercise,” said Eric Dickson, M.D., UI associate professor and head of emergency medicine in the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and the study’s lead investigator. “We have known for a long time that exercise is great for the heart. This study helps us better understand why.”

Studies have shown that regular vigorous exercise reduces the risk of having a heart attack and improves survival rates following heart attack, even in people with cardiovascular disease. In addition, exercise also decreases the risk of atherosclerosis, stroke, osteoporosis and even depression. However, despite these proven health benefits, much less is understood about how exercise produces these benefits.

The UI study investigated the idea that the opioids produced by exercise might have a direct role in cardio-protection. The researchers compared rats that exercised with rats that did not. As expected, exercised rats sustained significantly less heart damage from a heart attack than non-exercised rats. The researchers then showed that blocking opioid receptors completely eliminated these cardio-protective effects in exercising rats, suggesting that opioids are responsible for some of the cardiac benefits of exercise.

The UI team also showed that exercise was associated with transient increases in expression of several opioid system genes in heart muscle, and changes in expression of other genes that are involved in inflammation and cell death. The researchers plan to investigate whether these altered gene expression patterns reveal specific cardio-protective pathways.

A better understanding of how exercise protects the heart may eventually allow scientists to harness these protective effects for patients with decreased mobility.

“Hopefully this study will move us closer to developing therapies that mimic the benefits of exercise,” Dickson said. “It also serves as a reminder of how important it is to get out and exercise every day.”

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Article adapted by MD Only Weblog from original press release.
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Contact: Jennifer Brown
University of Iowa

In addition to Dickson, the UI research team included Christopher Hogrefe, Paula Ludwig, Laynez Ackermann, Lynn Stoll, Ph.D., and Gerene Denning, Ph.D.

STORY SOURCE: University of Iowa Health Science Relations, 5135, Westlawn, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1178

ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Abstract is available Click here

Athletes for years have found that the the low-glycemic carbohydrate Glycoose™ promotes utilization of body fat as energy source and thus improves metabolic fat oxidation in comparison to other carbohydrates. Glycose™ helps provide a sustained supply of energy from low glycemic carbloyhdrates , while at the same time supporting fat mobilization.

Time after time athletes report sustained energy to compete and finish their event in the absence of muscle fatique and cramps.

In comparing the effects of a Glycose™ -to a high fructose corn syrup and sucrose -based energy drinks, after consumption, athletes found they had longer sustained energy for competition and training and noticed lower body fat percentages after a few weeks. Moreover, a higher glycogen storage rate of energy production from carbohydrates was noted, along with the fat burning effect.